Harris Against Huntington’s Disease

Bruce Harris is a widely published U.K. author and poet who has been consistently successful in short fiction and poetry competitions over the last twelve years.

In October 2016, his partner was diagnosed with Huntington’s Disease, and he is now donating all his own takings from his published work to the Huntington’s Disease Association.

Copies of 'Odds Against' and 'Kaleidoscope'
are also available from:
THE END BOOKSHOP
54 QUEEN STREET, SEATON, DEVON EX12 2B

Huntington’s Disease

Huntington's disease is an inherited disorder that causes progressive damage to your brain cells. This leads to problems in controlling your movements and changes in your personality and mental ability. Huntington's disease causes progressive damage to cells in areas of your brain called the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex. These areas are involved in your control of movement and the way you think, understand and remember.

Most people with Huntington's disease develop symptoms between the ages of 30 and 50, but it can start at any age. Symptoms differ from person to person, but get gradually worse, usually over a period of about 10 to 20 years until the person dies.  According to research in the UK, it’s thought that about 12 in 100,000 people are affected by Huntington’s disease. The disease affects men and women equally.

Huntington's disease used to be called Huntington's chorea. Chorea means jerky, involuntary movements – such movements are one of the main symptoms. BUPA

About Bruce Harris bruce harris

Bruce Harris began writing fiction and poetry in 2004 following a career in teaching and educational research.

He has published two collections of award-winning stories, ‘First Flame’, by the SentinelPoetry Movement in 2013, and ‘Odds Against’, published in 2017 by www.earlyworkspress.co.uk and two poetry anthologies, ‘Raised Voices’, again including a number of award winners, self-published in 2014, and ‘Kaleidoscope’, published 2017 by www.artificium.co.uk

Following his partner’s diagnosis of Huntington’s Disease, an inherited illness involving physical and cognitive problems, in October 2016, he has dedicated his takings from all books to the Huntington’s Disease Association, www.hda.org.uk

Bruce’s awards list includes prizes, commendations or listings in competitions organised by:
Momaya Press, Writers’ Bureau (twice)
Grace Dieu Writers’ Circle (five times)
Cinnamon Press, Artificium (twice)
Biscuit Publishing,
Yeovil Prize,
Milton Keynes Speakeasy (three times),
Exeter Writers
Fylde Writers
First Writer
Brighton Writers (three times)
Ifanca Helene James Competition
Ink Tears
Ilkley Festival
Wells Literary Festival
Wirral Festival of Firsts
New Writer, Segora (twice)
Sentinel Quarterly
Swale Life
Rubery Short Story Competition
Mearns Writers
Nantwich Festival
Bedford Writing Competition
Havant Literary Festival
Earlyworks Press
Southport Writers’ Circle (twice)
West Sussex Writers
Lichfield Writers’ Circle
Writers at Lovedean
Cheer Reader (three times)
TLC Creative
3into1 Short Story Competition
Waterloo Commemoration Short Story Competition
Meridian
Homestart Bridgwater Competition
Five Stop Story (three times)
JB Writers’ Bureau
Red Line (three times)
Bridport Prize shortlist (twice) and
Bristol Prize longlist

He has also been extensively published in magazines and e-zines. See www.harriscentral.org

His short fiction and poetry has also been published one or more times in:
Linnet’s Wings (Ireland),
Artificium,
Carillon
Sarisvati
Delivered
Indigo Rising U.K.
Morbid Outlook (Canada)
Inkapture
Iota
Fire,
Black Rose
Fiction on the Web
Winamop
Snakeskin
Neonbeam
Ranfurly Review
The Recusant
Hackwriters
Writer’s Muse
Daily Satire
Swale Life
Sentinel Champions
Flash 500
Running Out of Ink
Vintage Script
Red Line
Misfit Miscellany
and in anthologies for the Yeovil Prize
Biscuit Publishing Competition
Fylde Writers’ Prize
Momaya Press
3 in 1 short story Competition in aid of the Arthrogryposis Group
Carillon ‘Ten Forward’ Anniversary Collection
The Waterloo Collection
The Robin Hood Book

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About Huntington's Disease

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a devastating, degenerative neurological disorder that causes progressive mental deterioration, significant behavioural changes and severe physical incapacity.

It is a completely disabling hereditary condition that affects generations upon generations of families. Each child of a parent with HD has a 50% chance of inheriting the faulty gene; it doesn’t skip a generation, so if a child tests positive they will, at some stage, develop HD. It’s like tossing a coin. H.D.A.

Huntington's disease is an inherited condition that damages certain nerve cells in the brain. This brain damage gets progressively worse over time and can affect movement, cognition (perception, awareness, thinking, judgement) and behaviour.

Early features can include personality changes, mood swings, fidgety movements, irritability and altered behaviour, although these are often overlooked and attributed to something else.

Huntington's disease was originally called Huntington's chorea ("chorea" is the Greek word for dancing). This is because the involuntary movements associated with the condition can look like jerky dancing. However, "disease" is now the preferred term, because the condition involves a lot more than just abnormal movements.

Huntington's disease is caused by an inherited faulty gene, but in around 3% of cases, there's no family history of the condition, normally because the parents died at a young age. N.H.S.

Juvenile Huntington’s disease (HD) is a less common, early-onset form of Huntington’s disease that begins in childhood or adolescence.

It is also a progressive disorder that causes the breakdown of brain cells in certain areas of the brain. This results in uncontrolled movements, loss of intellectual abilities, and emotional disturbances. Juvenile HD is defined by the onset of symptoms before age 20 years and accounts for 5-10% of HD cases.

It is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is caused by a mutation, trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene. Most often, children with juvenile HD inherit the mutation repeat from their fathers, although on occasion they inherit it from their mothers. 

Juvenile Huntington disease has a rapid disease progression once symptoms present. There currently is no cure. Treatment is supportive and focused on increasing quality of life. Rare Diseases

Huntington's disease is an incurable, hereditary brain disorder. It is a devastating disease for which there is no currently "effective" treatment.

Nerve cells become damaged, causing various parts of the brain to deteriorate. The disease affects movement, behavior and cognition - the affected individuals' abilities to walk, think, reason and talk are gradually eroded to such a point that they eventually become entirely reliant on other people for their care.

Huntington's disease has a major emotional, mental, social and economic impact on the lives of patients, as well as their families. Medical News Today

Juvenile Huntington’s Disease
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary condition that causes abnormal movements and other physical signs as well as emotional, cognitive and other physical problems.

It usually presents in middle life, although it can present at any age. Juvenile Huntington’s disease (JHD) is the name given to any affected person who has signs or symptoms before the age of 20 years.

This group makes up about 5-10% of all people with HD, and so it is a relatively rare condition in the general population. This can make dealing with JHD an isolating experience for the young people with HD, their families and also professionals involved with them. H.D.A.

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About Huntington's Disease Association

The Huntington's Disease Association (HDA) is the only organisation providing a dedicated service of advice, guidance and support for people in England and Wales who are affected by Huntington's Disease. We run a regional Specialist HD Advisory Service to support those directly affected by the disease, and their families and carers, delivered by our HD experts and tailored to the individual needs of the families we work with.

Our Specialist HD Advisers are a vital lifeline helping HD sufferers to navigate the complex care, health and emotional needs of the condition. Our advisers provide practical information, give advice and emotional support to families, identify local services, coordinate the organisation of care packages and answer crisis calls.

There are approximately 6,000 people suffering from Huntington’s in the UK. For every person diagnosed another four people are at risk. That’s 24,000 people whose lives will, at some point, be turned upside down by the anguish of waiting for a diagnosis, or taking their chances without. These people are referred to as ‘at risk’ and may exhibit early signs of HD, such as slight uncontrollable muscular movements, stumbling and clumsiness, lack of concentration, short term memory lapses and sometimes aggressive or anti-social behaviour. They are frequently unfairly judged as appearing drunk and uncooperative, which is often compounded by depression and thoughts of suicide.

Supporting individuals and families is our core focus. Our 23 Specialist HD Advisers are currently working with a total of 13,639 people affected by HD across England and Wales. Many of these are HD patients, but they also help those at risk, and their families and carers, who shoulder the heavy burden of caring for their loved ones.Although there is currently no cure for HD, the specialist expertise we provide empowers patients and families to manage the condition, and helps to reduce the extreme fear and isolation they often feel.

Please visit www.hda.org.uk for more information on the disease and for ways to donate to the Charity.

Juvenile Huntington’s Disease

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary condition that causes abnormal movements and other physical signs as well as emotional, cognitive and other physical problems.

It usually presents in middle life, although it can present at any age. Juvenile Huntington’s disease (JHD) is the name given to any affected person who has signs or symptoms before the age of 20 years.

This group makes up about 5-10% of all people with HD, and so it is a relatively rare condition in the general population. This can make dealing with JHD an isolating experience for the young people with HD, their families and also professionals involved with them. H.D.A.